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pulse single development platform and a single SKU, independent of the communication protocol used. With this, BLE-based smart phone connectivity for proximity-based services can combine with Thread or ZigBee 3.0 for smart home services. More information about the IoT is available by downloading the newest Qorvo free e-book series, «Internet of Things For Dummies.» (pictured) The two-volume series is designed to help technical and non-technical professionals understand the intricacies of the IoT. The e-books are available at: www.qorvo.com/ iot-for-dummies Europe’s Galileo GNSS goes ‘live’ Thursday 15th December 2016 saw Europe’s Global satellite navigation system finally switched on. After 17 years and more than €10 billion euros ($11 billion) later, the Galileo satnav system promises to, “outperform US and Russian systems while boosting regional self-reliance.” Initial services will be free to use worldwide on smartphones and navigation boxes fitted with Galileo compatible chips. Some devices – according to The European Commission and galileognss.eu – may only need a software update to start using the new technology, as several smartphone companies were already making chips compatible with it. The official statement says that, “at first the signals might be a little weak” - which appears to refer to the incomplete constellation, meaning that well-positioned satellites will often not be available, rather than RF signals being lower than they might be - “but will be boosted with help from satellites in the US military-run GPS system, and grow stronger over time as orbiters are added”, to the current count of 18. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), Galileo should be fully operational by 2020, providing time and positioning data of unprecedented accuracy. Once complete, the system will consist Complete article, here of 24 operational satellites and ground infrastructure for the provision of positioning, navigation and timing services. Galileo also has will have more satellites than either GPS or GLONASS, with better signals that carry more information. With these features, Galileo’s free Open Service will be able to track positions to within 1m, compared to several metres for GPS and GLONASS. Its signal will eventually reach areas where which have not been possible so far i.e. inside traffic tunnels and in ‘urban canyons’. A subscription service will allow clients to track locations even closer, to within centimetres, and governments will have access to an encrypted continued service for use in times of crisis Complete article, here 10 EDN Europe January 2017 www.edn-europe.com


EDNE JAN 2017
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