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EDNE MAY 2014

pulse 20-bit SAR ADC wins on precision, speed, & power Engineers can achieve the industry’s highest resolution and fastest sampling rate at the lowest power with the MAX11905, a 20-bit, 1.6 Msamples/sec successive approximation register (SAR) analogue-to-digital converter (ADC), while saving up to 91% power and up to 50% space. Typically, Maxim says, when you need high-precision data conversion, you may turn to a delta-sigma ADC. However, to produce high precision and wide dynamic range, those ADCs must consume at least 100 mW of power. The MAX11905 SAR ADC consumes 9 mW – a 91% power savings. With this power savings comes very high (20-bit) precision and the fastest sampling (1.6 Msamples/sec) rate available. The MAX11905 also integrates internal reference buffers, and saves up to 50% space compared to competitive discrete solutions. Use MAX11905 in applications including process control, automatic test equipment, medical instrumentation, and battery-powered devices. MAX11905 enables 1.6 Msamples/sec throughout with no latency and settling time limitation. The ADC achieves 98.3 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and -123 dB THD; improves static and dynamic performance; guarantees monotonic function; and provides lowest power consumption. It delivers 20-bit resolution with no missing codes, at 1.6 Msamples/ sec, and at 9mW. In a 20-pin, 4 x 4 mm TQFN package, and specified over -40 to +85C, it costs $33.95 (1000). ARM switches to open-source base for Acompiler updates RM has announced version 6 of the ARM Compiler, the reference code generation toolchain for the ARM architecture. Version 6 marks a shift from a fully-proprietary tool chain to one that is based on open-source code. ARM says that the “velocity” of open source Clang and LLVM, combined with the stability of commercial products, will improve code quality, performance and power efficiency on ARM processors. The company emphasises that the rest of the tool chain remains ARM-proprietary – the change is limited to the compiler and the distinction is that the compiler is “based on” open-source but is not in its entirety open-source. The first architecture to be supported under this arrangement will be ARM v8, for which ARM anticipates seeing the first silicon at licensees “soon”. This means that users will be able to draw on the open-source LLVM community for immediate improvements, and that ARM will Complete article, here periodically – around twice a year – take a “snapshot” of the evolving code base, test and verify it, and give it a release number. The licensing context is also favourable to this approach, ARM says; being “permissive” it allows users to draw on the code base without necessarily feeding back their changes, so “closed”, tuned, versions are possible. Support for the established ARM compiler will continue in parallel, for, “anyone who wants or needs it,” the company says, citing in particular, users working on safety-critical systems. There will also continue to be a path for users developing for Linux/Android targets. ARM Compiler 6 supports the ARM Cortex-A50 processor series and is available as part of the DS-5 Development Studio Ultimate Edition, available now. Complete article, here 6 EDN Europe | MAY 2014 www.edn-europe.com


EDNE MAY 2014
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