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EDNE MAY 2015

pulse Bluetooth SIG promotes developer’s kit to speed IoT projects At the Bluetooth World event, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) announced beta availability of its Bluetooth Developer Studio, a software-based development kit that cuts developer learning time for Bluetooth technology and dramatically speeds product development. Bluetooth Developer Studio makes building with Bluetooth technology for the IoT – according to the SIG - “simple for developers from the novice to the experienced.” Bluetooth Developer Studio is a graphical, GATT-based application development and debugging tool that could cut Bluetooth education time by up to 50%, with access to tutorials and code samples to jumpstart development. Based on feedback from alpha users and veteran Bluetooth developers, the toolset could shorten development time by as much as 70% (the SIG believes). The Bluetooth Developer Studio’s drag and drop functionality lets developers find the Bluetooth profile they need, build on it and create their project quickly. The tool auto-generates code from third-party solutions, such as Bluetooth chip and module suppliers, and can test with both virtual and physical device options. Intel's 10nm secrets predicted By Rick Merritt, EETimes A semiconductor analyst is making a bold and detailed prediction about the process technology Intel Corp. will use for its next two generations. If he is right, the world’s largest chip maker is set to leapfrog the industry once again. Intel will use quantum well FETs starting with its 10nm process, said David Kanter in an analysis posted on his Real World Technologies Web site. The new transistor structures will use two new materials – indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) for n-type transistors and strained germanium for p-type devices, he said. If correct, Intel could gain a capability as early as 2016 to produce 10nm transistors operating as much as 200 mV lower, for lower power consumption, than the rest of the industry. Kanter expects other chip makers will not be able to catch up with the techniques until their 7nm node, at least two years later. It could take more than a year before Intel discloses its 10nm plans, Kanter said, giving his own predictions an 80-90%confidence level. Kanter’s analysis is based on a study of about two dozen Intel research papers mainly presented at the annual International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM), a leading gathering of chip makers. He also analysed as many Intel patents related to chip making. “Everything I saw pointed in this direction,” Kanter told EE Times. “The question is not, 'will Intel do quantum well FETs?', the question is, 'will it be at 10 or 7nm?” he said. Complete article, here Complete article, here 15 EDN Europe | MAY 2015 www.edn-europe.com


EDNE MAY 2015
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