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Self-encrypting drive wipes itself out if breached Toshiba Electronics Europe‘s MQ01ABUxxxBW series of selfencrypting drive (SED) has been validated to the FIPS 140-2 standard (the US Federal Information Processing Standard). It It includes Toshiba’s unique wipe technology, which automatically erases data when an HDD is accessed by an unregistered system. The mobile-grade thin 7mm hard disk drive (HDD) is designed to the Trusted Computing Group’s (TCG) industry-standard “Opal” Security Sub-Classification. This globally accepted standard, implements protocols created to help IT managers, security management application providers and client security professionals manage data security and prevent potentially damaging and costly breaches to sensitive information. In addition, the FIPS-validated model provides tamper-evident labelling for additional security. SEDs perform encryption securely within the drive’s hardware at full interface speeds, improving system performance versus software encryption, which performs encryption as a background software task that can negatively impact user productivity. In addition, SEDs eliminates the need for a “re-encryption” cycle during initial client configuration. What’s more the SEDs encryption functionality cannot be disabled, decreasing the risk that security practices required by policy for legal compliance might be put at risk by end-user actions. Toshiba Electronics www.storage.toshiba.eu Ultrasound beamforming source driver Supertex‘ MD2133 is a programmable high-speed sourcedriver for pulsed current applications. Aimed at medical ultrasound beam-forming applications, the part can also be used in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU), Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) using ultrasound, Laser Diode Drive, and other instrumentation applications such as arbitrary waveform generation. The MD2133 contains CMOS digital logic input circuits, an 8-bit current DAC for aperture weighting control, as well as an 8-bit fast pulse current switch matrix. The MD2133 supports both Pulse-Current Amplitude Modulation (PAM) and Pulse-Width Modulation (PWM) with an in-phase and quadrature I-Q current-switch, and a built-in sine and cosine angle-to-vector look-up table. The angular resolution of the vector table is 1.4°/step with a total range of 256 steps/360°. The 8x1k bits waveform memory can pre-store data for up to four waveforms. The stored parameters for each include data length, start address, cycle limits or continuous looping mode, the transmit frequency pre-scale (N divisor), selection for polarity swapping (fast launch), chirp-up /down for FM and forward / reverse transmit (time-symmetrical waveforms for fewer data points). Two SSTL differential clock inputs control all the waveform writing, read back, transmit delay, and frequencies. The high-speed SPI bus enables fast data updates per-scan-line updating for dynamically changing delay times, as well as for weighting and waveform selection. Supertex www.supertex.com MOSFETs target high-current motor control and power designs Texas Instruments’ latest NexFET mid-voltage power MOSFETs include lowest on-resistance 80-V and 100-V devices in TO-220 packages. 14 power MOSFETs in TO-220 and SON packages support input voltages from 40 to 100V. The high-efficiency NexFETs include 40-V, 60-V, 80-V and 100-V N-channel devices that provide excellent thermal performance to a wide range of high-current motor control and power applications. Two of the new 80-V and 100-V NexFET devices claim the industry’s lowest on-resistance in a TO-220 package without sacrificing high gate charge – giving designers more power conversion efficiency at higher currents. The CSD19506 supports 2.0 mΩ of Rds(on) at an input voltage of up to 80V, while the CSD19536 achieves 2.3 mΩ of Rds(on) at a 100-V input. Both products feature plastic packages with high avalanche capability to support high-stress motor control applications. Designers can select the new products and simulate their power designs by accessing TI’s WEBENCH online design tool. TI also introduced several evaluation modules based on its 60-V NexFET products; Stepper motor pre-driver: the DRV8711EVM evaluation module is based on the DRV8711 stepper motor controller paired with NexFET devices to drive a high-current bipolar stepper motor or two brushed DC motors. Texas Instruments www.ti.com/mvnexfet-pr RFID tags talk to electronic appliances through I2C interface On the footsteps of NXP’s Ntag I2C devices, Murata announced the mass production of an RFID chip with a wired I2C interface, the LXMS2HACNF-165. Conforming to the RFID standards ISO/ IEC 18000-6C, EPC global C1G2 and operating in the 900 MHz frequency band, this device complements the company’s surface mount Magicstrap RFID family of devices. The I2C interface enables other circuits mounted on the customer’s equipment to be read using an UHF RFID-Reader/Writer, via the RFID chip making the connection. The data in the RFID device can also be read by an IC, enabling the management of memory settings in consumer appliances prior to shipping. The settings of equipment can be changed even when it is packaged in a carton box immediately before shipment. The I2C interface extends the possible applications far beyond the typical use cases of previous Magicstrap RFID tags which were confined to process management, commodity management or traceability. The tag could retrieve appliance error log data from an internal MCU, or could record environmental data such as temperature changes in food service supply chain logistics applications and communicate it to an appropriate RFID reader/writer, even when the equipment is malfunctioning or switched off. Murata Europe www.murata.eu www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe April 2014 47


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