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spot monitoring (rear), lane change assistance and rear crosstraffic alerts. Radar or vision? As to the future of ADAS, the auto industry isn’t choosing radar over vision or vice versa. Euro NCAP isn’t mandating either radar or vision. Nor is it asking carmakers to have both. A carmaker can rely on a more advanced radar system combined with a lighter vision system or, conversely, choose to go with a more advanced vision sensor with a lighter version of radar. Vision technologies excel in tasks like detecting lane markings and other road information, such as reading traffic signs, reliably detecting pedestrians, and lighting functions such as controlling the high/low beams. On the other hand, vision technologies can’t handle some jobs, like seeing through snow and fog. Dirt renders vision sensors blind. Unlike radar, vision technology can’t see very far. Long-range radar (LRR) can comfortably handle between 30 and 150 meters, and short-range radar (SRR) can detect objects within 30 meters. The automotive industry is looking for both solutions as a package. Freescale is doing exactly that. Just last Lars Reger, VP, strategy, new business, and R&D for automotive at NXP. week, Freescale unveiled at the Mobile World Congress its S32V microprocessor. Inside the automotive vision SoC is CogniVue’s second-generation APEX Image Cognition Processing technology. The SoC additionally supports the fusion of vision data captured by the S32V device. Fused in are other data streams, including radar, LiDAR and ultrasonic information to enhance resolution and image recognition, Freescale said. Meanwhile, Freescale has its own radar solution. Its MR2001 is a high-performance 77GHz radar transceiver chipset “scalable for multi-channel operation enabling a single radar platform International Exhibition and Conference for Power Electronics, Intelligent Motion, Renewable Energy and Energy Management Nuremberg, 19 – 21 May 2015 More information at +49 711 61946-0 pcim@mesago.com or pcim-europe.com with electronic beam steering and wide field-of-view to support multi-range applications across automotive safety, communications infrastructure, and industrial systems,” according to Freescale. In vision Freescale and NXP have solutions using different vision algorithms experts. Freescale works with CogniVue and NXP is partnered with Mobileye. In radar technologies, the merged entity is likely to profit from each other’s diverging technology and market experience (Freescale’s SiGe-based radars; NXP’s nascent efforts for CMOS radar front-end transmitter chip). Work has only begun NXP’s Reger acknowledges that the work has only begun on a single-chip all CMOS radar transceiver in future. Aside from integrating the radar frontend chip with MCUs to make a complete system-level solution for ADAS applications, antenna developments also need to come along to shrink the module. Obviously, CMOS is lower cost, better integrates digital circuitry and benefits from technology scaling, compared to a SiGe bipolar process, but some say that’s not enough. The maximum available gain at millimeter wave frequencies is known to be lower for CMOS, and its low supply voltage reportedly limits output power. NXP’s Reger, however, noted that the team is working on “the best radar illumination,” to make more powerful, accurate and high-performance millimeter wave sensors that work for various range applications including mid and short-range. The team is also working on a new scheme to connect multiple CMOS radar front-end chips via automotive Ethernet, so that they work as one. NXP’s Dophin operates on 80GHz band, “plus or minus a few GHz,” making it work between 77GHz and 81GHz, according to Reger. Power meets electronics– Join the PCIM Europe! Your market place for power electronics www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe April 2015 35


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