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EETE APR 2015

Try out CVD graphene on substrates up to 100x200mm Helping the semiconductor industry unlock graphene’s potential, graphene supplier 2-DTech has made further advances in the fabrication of graphene products using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) techniques. The company is now able to deliver polycrystalline graphene films of the highest quality, claimed to outperform what the competition can deliver in terms of low defect density and high mobility. Customers can expect an average mobility value of approximately 2250 cm2/V.s. 2-DTech is able to supply its CVD graphene products in a range of different sizes and on a variety of substrates. They can be grown on to copper substrates with dimensions reaching 100x200mm. Alternatively its CVD graphene can be transferred onto various other substrates measuring up to 40x40mm, including SiO2, exfoliated hBN deposited on SiO2 and an array of customer requested materials. These products can be incorporated into photovoltaic, electronic and sensor devices in either graphene-only or multi-layer hetero-structure systems (where graphene is combined with other 2-D materials, such as the insulating hBN or the semiconducting MoS2). 2-DTech 3D stacked structure flash packs 16 GB Toshiba has announced the development of the world’s first 48-layer three dimensional stacked cell structure flash memory called BiCS, a 2-bit-per-cell 128-Gigabit (16 GigaBytes) device. Sample shipments of products using the new process technology start immediately. The BiCS is based on a 48-layer stacking process, which Toshiba says enhances the reliability of write/erase endurance and boosts write speed, and is suited for use in diverse applications, primarily solid state drives (SSD). The structure stacks flash memory cells iin a vertical direction, from a silicon plane, which allows significant density improvement over conventional NAND flash memory, where cells are arrayed in a planar direction on a silicon plane. Since making the world’s first announcement of technology for 3D Flash memory as long ago as 2007, Toshiba has continued development towards optimising mass production. To meet further market growth in 2016 and beyond, Toshiba confirms it is promoting the migration to 3D flash memory by rolling out a product portfolio that emphasizes large capacity applications, such as SSD. Toshiba Electronics Europe www.toshiba.semicon-storage.com IO-Link temperature sensor is more cost http://2-dtech.com efficient than discrete alternatives Maxim Integrated has introduced a reference design of an intelligent temperature sensor with IO-Link interface. Applied in industrial control applications, it enables lower cost and higher equipment uptime. The new IO-Link resistance temperature detector with the type designation MAXREFDES42# completes Maxim’s portfolio of IO reference designs for industrial automation and control environments. The highly integrated analog front end of this design enables temperature measurements and detects overvoltages, shorts, and open circuits. In this respect, it offers higher functionality than competing discrete solutions, the vendor claims. Besides very low power consumption the reference design features a high accuracy of better than ±0.5 K. The temperature measured is indicated immediately on the built-in LED display for quick-and-dirty overview measurements. To maximise application flexibility the reference design supports all three data rates specified for IO-Link, a unique feature in this market environment. The MAXREFDES42# can be used with platinum measurement resistors (Pt-RTDs) such as Pt-100, Pt-500 and Pt-1000 with two-, three- and four-line connection across a wide temperature range. Application examples include temperature measurements in air, gases and liquids. The configuration software for this intelligent IO-Link temperature sensor has been developed in collaboration with IQ2 Development. In the reference design, the IO-Link Device Stack of IQ2 Development is utilised, enabling data exchange with any IO-Link 1.1 compatible master.. Maxim Integrated www.maximintegrated.com Ultra-low-power 32-bit MCU platform targets industrial and IoT applications Texas Instruments has unveiled a 32-bit alternative to the company’s 16-bit MSP430 family of microcontrollers. The MSP432 ARM-based MCU family’s low power architecture has been designed to provide MSP430 and ARM M0 developers migration paths to more feature packed solutions. TI’s MSP432 microcontroller (MCU) platform claims to be industry’s lowest power 32-bit ARM Cortex- M4F MCUs. To create the low power architecture solution, TI opted to build the MSP432 around the Cortex-M4F core architecture rather than ARM’s Cortex-M0 core following the realisation that traditional industrial control applications and future Internet of Things applications require a more feature-rich solution that is low in power usage. The 48 MHz MCUs apply TI’s ultra-low-power MCU expertise to optimize performance without compromising power, while consuming 95 μA/MHz in active power and 850 nA in standby power. Industry-leading integrated analog, such as a highspeed 14-bit 1MSPS analog-to-digital converter (ADC), further optimizes power efficiency and performance. MSP432 MCUs enable designers to develop ultra-low-power embedded applications such as industrial and building automation, industrial sensing, industrial security panels, asset tracking and consumer electronics where both efficient data processing and enhanced low-power operation are essential. The MSP432 MCUs claim to deliver a best-in-class ULPBench score of 167.4 – outperforming all other Cortex-M3 and -M4F MCUs on the market. Texas Instruments www.ti.com 42 Electronic Engineering Times Europe April 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE APR 2015
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