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HW: How much did you learn from your stints at companies such as TI and Sony? JB: You learn from every job and every experience. At TI, I learned the American-style operational culture, which is based on tight control and attention to accountability. At Sony I learnt that not everything has to be run in a military fashion, and that you have to build consensus through people you can’t necessarily control and through indirect influence. HW: Would you take a start-up proposition over a large corporation every time? JB: Absolutely. A start up to a small or mid-size. For me, Dialog is the right size to express all the things that I have learnt. We have the money and capability to change things and influence our future. The management currently at Dialog really enjoys being able to execute on the strategy and implement the changes that they propose, and very often to then quickly see the direct impact of those changes. That’s because we are the right size to allow change to quickly take place. HW: You have high dependency on a single customer. Does this make you nervous? JB: Not if the company that you are dependent on is one of the most successful electronics companies in the history of the world. If you’re not working with the leaders, then you are probably doing something wrong. The mobile market is quite bifurcated at the moment. The top two or three players dominate the market and the rest don’t make much revenue or profit: in fact they lose money. The other thing to remember is that if your mission is to be in a high volume, high-growth market – which is our mission – you have to work with the leaders and trendsetters. HW: You have stated that Dialog is evolving through “innovative partnerships”. What does that term mean? JB: A lot of semiconductor companies are reluctant to cooperate with other semiconductor companies, or have a mentality of ‘not invented here’ and try to do everything internally. We’re not like that. We proceed cautiously, but we are open to do business with anybody as long as it is right for our company. We will enter a market early, will do joint ventures, joint product development and strategic investments into start-ups. We are even happy for partners to put their logos on the end product, if that’s what it takes. We do not have a big ego. That’s what I mean by innovation in the partnership model. HW: How is Dialog starting to work with China? JB: To work in China effectively you must understand the need to have deep roots in the market. We don’t have that, and it’s not likely that we will achieve than in less than a decade, either. By definition, developing commercial relationships with China takes time and that is something I like to shortcut. Since we don’t have the limitless resources to go pounding the streets, our innovation comes from partnering with somebody who is already big there, such as MediaTek who have over 50% market share in smartphone chipsets in China. Prototyping 3D Circuitry Extension of the interconnect pattern into the third dimension adds new potential. The LPKF ProtoLaser 3D for laser direct structuring (LDS) gives engineers an outstanding flexible and economical access to 3D prototypes. Discover for yourself a new dimension: lpkf.com/protolaser3D LPKF Laser & Electronics AG Phone +49 (0) 5131-7095-0 www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe December 2014 21


EETE DEC 2014
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