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Harwin M300 EETImes Europe third page Dec 14.qxd The CPID chip also contains information about the performance of the cable assembly. High Reliability Performance to 10 Amps - Extremes of temperature -65 to +175ºC - Four finger contact ensures connectivity in high vibration environments - Up to 1,000 operations - Jackscrew security system - Small PCB footprint For technical specifications go to: www.harwin.com/M300 It tells us whether it’s single-or multi-mode fiber, Cat6 or Cat6A cable. If a technician grabs the wrong cord and plugs it in, the administrator can see there’s a cable mismatch and can stop cable mismatch problems before they occur. In the event of a man-in-the-middle attack the system will alarm you in all possible cases where the connector is removed, replaced by another connector or moved to a different position, even telling you when the system was powered down when the change happened. PLM systems have event monitoring and alarming capabilities. When a particular patch cord is inserted or disconnected the system identifies the problem. This helps administrators quickly identify and respond to physical network breaches and accidental circuit disconnections. All systems offer different degrees of data and it is key to integrate the solution to your business processes to ensure your network is up and operational. PLM and physical security With the PLM system in place, the administrator can see if someone changes a patch cord to reroute a signal or runs a man-in-the-middle attack, because the administrator knows that the original connector has been disconnected, and that a different connector has been plugged in. Another means of attacking the physical layer is by making unauthorised changes and enabling other circuits. Even if you have documentation saying that Switch Port 1 goes to Outlet Office 1, if a person has access to the wiring closet, he or she can make changes in the patching and route those signals to another location. A network tech would have to physically respond and trace the cable to figure out where it’s been rerouted. That takes about 50 minutes, during which time someone has the chance to attack the network. With PLM, the administrator can see when someone plugs in a patch cord and introduces a new connection to the physical layer, and can quickly direct the network tech to the precise location. From an intruder security or uptime security standpoint, you want network changes conducted when and where they are scheduled and you want to know when anyone is making any changes to the network. The PLM system monitors port connectivity at all times. Whenever a change is made that resolves the end-to-end points of that circuit, you’re getting that feedback in real time. PLM alarming A full-featured PLM system offers a number of different ways to send out messages. It can send e-mail to specified users so they can shut down a circuit or physically audit the breach. The system can also send notifications through e-mail to the company’s security department, so, for example, if a surveillance camera goes down or a rogue device is connected they can send someone to address it. In addition, the PLM software can interface to other network management systems. It can use APIs that connect to other applications so that there could be a rule that when an unauthorised device connects, the network management system turns off that port. A more sophisticated rule could shunt the rogue user onto another network and set him or her up for capture by security personnel. CPID chips embedded in a patch panel. There are many types of PLM solutions that provide a range of visibility and control to the physical layer network. By delivering information about the state of the physical network, and bringing the physical layer under the same visibility as management systems do for Layers 2-7, PLM systems complete the network security picture. Having a system in place to identify accidental and intentional connections and disconnections will allow you to identify when and where circuit changes occur and mitigate any service downtime and security risk. www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe December 2014 33


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