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Smaller, uprated ESD protection diode for high-speed interfaces Toshiba Electronics Europe ESD (electrostatic discharge) protection diode type DF5G7M2N is rated to protect equipment attached to communication lines, using high-speed interfaces such as USB3.1, HDMI, DisplayPort and Thunderbolt from static electricity. It can also be used to protect small portable devices such as smartphones and tablets from ESD events. In a 1.3 x 0.8 mm DFN5 package that reduces its footprint to less than 50% of that of similar products, the DF5G7M2N simplifies wiring design, making it suitable for high density mounting. This ESD diode presents low capacitance and low dynamic resistance (CT=0.2 pF, RDYN=1Ω). It also suppresses signal quality deterioration (insertion loss) by lowering capacitance (|S21|2 = -1.3 dB @f=10 GHz) and provides high ESD resistance, ±8 kV. Toshiba Electronics Europe www.toshiba-components.com 10-W wireless power delivery promises faster, cooler charging without plugging in TI’s receiver and transmitter system efficiently charges one- and two-cell battery-powered applications, and supports any Qi-compatible 5-W wireless charging system Claimed as the first fully integrated 10-W wireless charging receiver and corresponding transmitter, the bq51025 and bq500215 enable waterproof and dustproof portable designs and provide a faster, cooler charge to one- and twocell (1S and 2S) Li-Ion batteries. The charging solution is also compatible with any 5-W Qi-compliant product in the market – allowing consumers the flexibility to charge in more places. The bq51025 receiver supports a programmable output voltage of 4.5 to 10 V and achieves up to 84% charging efficiency at 10-W when paired with TI’s bq500215 wireless power transmitter, significantly improving thermal performance. The fully-contained wireless power receiver solution measures 3.60 by 2.89 mm, and can be designed into many portable industrial designs. The bq500215 is a dedicated, fixed-frequency 10-W wireless power digital controller transmitter compatible with 5-W Qi receivers. The transmitter features an enhanced foreign object detection (FOD) method that detects objects before any power is transferred, and actively reduces power if excessive loss is detected. Qi-compliant communications and control ensures compatibility with any Wireless Power Consortium Qi-certified transmitter or receiver up to 5W. The wireless charging solution’s I²C communications interface allows better alignment of the receiver on the transmitter surface, as well as ability to send proprietary packets of data between the receiver and transmitter. Both devices will be compatible with TI’s future medium power Qi-compliant transmitters and receivers. Texas Instruments www.ti.com Polarizing filter reduces energy drain from smartphone displays A polarizing filter has been developed by University of Utah engineers which allows in more light, leading the way for mobile device displays that last much longer on a single battery charge and cameras that can shoot in dim light. Polarizers are indispensable in digital photography and LCD displays, but they block enormous amounts of light, wasting energy and making it more difficult to photograph in low light. The Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers created the filter by etching a silicon wafer with nanoscale pillars and holes using a focused gallium-ion beam. The new concept in light filtering can perform the same function as a standard polarizer but allows up to nearly 30 percent more light to pass through, explained University of Utah electrical and computer engineering associate professor Rajesh Menon. The study is being published in Novembers issue of Optica, a new journal from The Optical Society. Sunlight as well as most ambient light emits half of its energy as light polarized along a horizontal axis and the other half along a vertical axis. A polarizer typically allows only half of the light to pass because it is permitting either the horizontal or vertical energy to go through, but not both. Meanwhile, the other half is reflected back or absorbed, but the resulting image is much darker. Most polarizers will eliminate anywhere from to 60 to 70 percent of the light. With the new polarizer, much of the light that normally is reflected back is instead converted to the desired polarized state. The University of Utah researchers have been able to pass through about 74 percent of the light, though their goal is to eventually allow all of the light to pass through. Micro DC/DC converters fit wearable devices With a 6-MHz power switch embedded in its miniature PCB, the TDK EPCOS B30000P80 ultra-compact DC/DC converter module claims space savings of up to 35% compared to conventional discrete solutions for use in wearable devices and cameras, as well as WLAN, GPS, and Bluetooth applications. Micro converters in the series have a footprint of only 2.9 × 2.3 mm and an insertion height of 1 mm. The modules accommodate an input voltage range of 2.2V to 5.5V. Comprising eight models, the B30000P80 series offers output voltages ranging from 1.10V to 2.80V and maximum output current of 600 mA. All converter modules employ overload protection and will shut down automatically at excess temperatures. Their efficiency of 92% makes them well-suited for battery-powered devices. Under light loads, the modules operate in power-save mode using pulse frequency modulation, with a typical quiescent current of 24 μA. The converters can be shut down using an enable input. In this case, the supply current drops to below 1 μA. They also feature fast load transient response and low ripple voltages and currents. Devices operate over a temperature range of –40° to +85°C. TDK EPCOS www.epcos.com www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe December 2014 47


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