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No need to hack into the communication link or try to establish a dialogue with the pilot for that, although you could imagine a small flag popping up reading “your drone is under arrest” for the video record. By knowing exactly what commercial drone is being used (and having studied its communication link beforehand), one could even try to hack into the system to take over flight control. Catching the drone or taking it down is more problematic, admits Schulze. Simply taking the drone down could create accidents if it was hovering over high-voltage installations or over chemical plants. “We would have to build an intelligent mapping system so the interceptor drone would know exactly where it is, inside or outside the industrial estate, and if there are any roads or populated areas nearby” he commented. In some cases you could just wait for the trespassing Fig. 3: A conceptual illustration of the AVIGLE project implementation. drone to drop short of battery power (typically a few minutes to around half-an-hour for most hobbyist drones), but for better control, one envisaged solution could be to equip the catcher drone with a releasable net, tied to a small parachute equipped with flashing LEDs for people on the ground. “A Tilt-wing drone like the prototype being developed by RWTH Aachen University for the AVIGLE European research project could be a good start” told us Schulze as we asked what type of drone would be suited to the task. The aim of the project is to come up with an autonomous flying service platform for operations within a swarm (so with anti-collision and communication capabilities). The tilt-wing allows for vertical take-off, with the hovering qualities of a rotorcraft. It also allows a progressive transition to a more energy-efficient horizontal flight mode like that of a fixed wing airplane. Specs of the AVIGLE project include speed capabilities ranging from 0 to 40m/s (144km/Hour), a maximum flight time of one hour, and a payload capability of 1.5kg. A more specific goal of the AVIGLE project is to build a 3D virtual reality environment based on the acquisition of near-real time 3D pictures by a swarm of unmanned flight platforms. The data would be transferred via a high performance LTE radio network (pico- cells that could also serve as on demand radio networks in situations with insufficient cell coverage), to cloud computers in order to generate a virtual world almost in real time. These pre-requisites would suit very well the context awareness that a fleet of interceptor drones would need in order to safely catch or power-freeze other drones. Korea, France join forces on driverless cars R&D By Christoph Hammerschmidt The governments of Korea and France decided to conduct jointly funded R&D projects to develop software and parts for driverless cars, reports newspaper Korea Joongang Daily. Other topics for the joint R&D efforts are wearables and digital medical devices. Through the joint R&D projects, the two countries hope to become market leaders in the new business areas. The projects will be successful with Korea’s strong information and communications technologies (ICT) and manufacturing technologies, and France’s wide pool of basic science and source technologies create synergy, said the assistant ministers at a forum earlier this week where more than 200 government officials, researchers and private sector executives from Korea and France discussed project details and schedules. Three working groups of scholars and private companies were formed in each of the three areas. Korean auto parts and telecom device developers including LG Electronics, Renault Samsung Motors and Hyundai Mobis, and Renault Motors from France, will jointly develop radar and communication modules, key parts of driverless cars. Researchers from Korea’s state-run Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute and Geneva-based STMicroelectronics agreed to participate in a joint project to develop a system semiconductor required in communication among wearable mobile devices and a central processing chip in cars. Korea’s top medical schools and French health care software developer Voluntis will jointly develop personalized medicine, consisting of treatment regimens based on genetic traits, DNA analytics technology and a big data management system that can quickly analyse patient’s genetic information. The projects will start next year with €2.17 million from the two countries and € 7.45 million from the European Commission’s Eureka program fund. 6 Electronic Engineering Times Europe December 2014 www.electronics-eetimes.com


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