Page 34

EETE DEC 2015

Connectivity & IoT tailored for MCUs.” Intel’s Vichini described it as a proprietary, internally designed core developed with feedback from unnamed customers and aimed at the low end of the microcontroller line. It is “a point product,” she said because unlike other members of the Quark family, the company does not plan any follow on for it. All three chips – the SE, D2000 and D1000 – are merely spins of the original synthesized Pentium-class core Intel announced as Quark in 2013, said Linley Gwennap, principal of The Linley Group (Mountain View, Calif.). The market watcher reported at that time Quark was one-fifth the size and one-tenth the power of Intel’s Atom core as originally demonstrated in a 32nm device. Presumably, even the D1000 is the same basic design stripped so bare it hits a lower cost point but no longer runs a full x86 ISA. In that light, the event had no hardware news, “but it showed that Intel is offering a broad range of IoT solutions from the client to the cloud,” Gwennap said pointing mainly to software Intel’s Wind River division announced. Rocket, a real-time OS for microcontrollers, was one of the more interesting new software announcements. It can fit into 4-8 Kbytes of memory and still support latency as low as Wind River’s flagship VxWorks although it lacks its extensive features. Wind River also announced a microcontroller-class Linux variant called Pulsar, available free as part of the Yocto project. Separately Intel offered a new bigdata analytics package as free open source code. Intel engineers created the Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) in just two weeks, re-packaging exiting open source components, yet it has attracted engagement from as many as 68 companies including Accenture, Amazon and Cloudera, said Diane Bryant, general manager of Intel’s data center group. Bryant was frank about the challenges companies face in big data analytics, something TAP is aimed to ease. It’s hard to find data scientists, and integrate them into existing IT departments, she said. In addition 70% of the investment in analytics comes in the drudgery of setting and managing data standards and filters before models can be created and refined to deliver useful predictions, she added. Representatives of Honeywell were on hand to talk about their work using Doug Davis’ showed an interesting slide on the cellular IoT road map. Honeywell’s smartwatch prototype using Quarkbased location and communications. MICA provides notifications for women who don’t want to carry a smartphone. Fossil is one of a handful of Intel’s fashion partners in wearables. TAP and Quark devices to track movements of firefighters and communicate with them during an emergency. So far, the program is a prototype that could take two years to turn into a product if Honeywell gets a thumbs up from its customers. Such examples showed Intel “still doesn’t have any big design wins in IoT, but they are working with many players and hoping that volume will eventually add up,” said analyst Gwennap. “Even if they don’t win the client, they still win the cloud, where they can deliver IoT services,” he added. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich kicked off the event followed by short talks from executives who manage Intel’s software, IoT, data center, R&D and security groups in a sign of the strategic weight Intel gives the emerging sector. Krzanich called IoT “a third wave of computing…The real future will be drivien by machine data going to the cloud that will be much larger than human traffic there today,” he said. Doug Davis, head of Intel’s IoT group, put a few numbers and a new acronym on the road map for IoTfriendly versions of cellular. The LTE-M and Narrowband-IoT versions of cellular expected in LTE Release 13 will support data rates of 160 Kbits/second up to a megabit. A so-called EC-GSM spec in Release 12 will support up to a Mbit/s and sounds similar to the timeframe and target for LTE Category 0 which was recently cancelled. A Honeywell product manager in full firefighter gear showed the prototype Quark device worn as a smartwatch. A few new prototype wearables were on display at the event along with ones Intel announced previously. Honeywell is using Quark-based location and communications devices in form factors of smartwatches and smartphones as part of its market test for first responders. Separately, a startup showed a prototype GPS tracker for children now being redesigned to use Quark. The MICA (My Intelligent Communications Accessory) co-developed with Opening Ceremony is a bracelet with a small display hidden on its back side. The device links to cellular and Bluetooth networks and has its own SIM card to deliver notifications and short canned responses. It costs $450 with a data plan. The Fossil smartwatch is the result of another of several co-development deals Intel has forged with fashion companies. Intel also acquired smartwatch designer basis and sports glass maker Recon. 34 Electronic Engineering Times Europe December 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE DEC 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above