Page 11

EETE FEB 2015

2.5D and 3D stacks. In his view, IC integration will never move away from interposers, but on the contrary, silicon interposers will be the SoCs sockets of the future, hosting multi-sourced 3D components whose functionalities can scale at their own pace. As the cost of stacked dies will reduce, OEMs will be able to leverage die-sharing instead of soft IP licensing, buying the best dies on the market and assembling them to craft their own SoCs. To do the integration themselves, large OEMs would want to invest in the OSATs or the foundries doing the packaging. During a coffee break, Black accepted to share more of his thoughts with EETimes Europe. “In the server space, who knows better than Google or Facebook The uncertainty of transistor costs according to AMD. what they need?” he said. “These guys don’t want to be tied to AMD or Intel’s hardware offerings, but they are not going either to out-innovate semiconductor firms, they just need to add their own innovation”. “So ideally, they would want an IC with a blank socket in it to do their own things”, commented Black, admitting he had had such discussions with Google engineers. This die-level IP sharing vision where large OEMs would buy guaranteed tested dies from different vendors and manage their own 2.5D interposer socket, in some cases even adding their own ASIC into the mix, is very much in line with the vertical re-integration scenario envisaged by ATREG. “It is an interesting time for a business model change”, concluded Black, hinting at the fact that silicon vendors may want to focus on selling more discrete dies of proven IP instead of large do-it-all integrated dies falling short of OEMs’ expectations. Silicon interposers will be the SoCs sockets of the future: source AMD. Flexible OLED displays target volume production in 2015 By Paul Buckley Plastic electronics specialist, Plastic Logic, which has been at the forefront of the development of truly flexible electronics technology, will split the technology development and manufacturing parts of the business. The separate elements will move forward as independent companies. The newly formed FlexEnable will be a Cambridge-based company comprising of three IP partnership offerings. FabEnable is intended to allow fabs to be built or upgraded to make flexible electronics. ProductEnable is targeted at those looking to create flexible electronics, while MaterialsEnable will help developers to assess and qualify materials for flexible electronics including a graphene based display. FlexEnable is focusing on ensuring that flexible displays will be in volume production by the end of 2015. The technology will enable products to be made on substrates as thin as 25μm which can withstand a transistor bend radius of 0.25mm that will allow the creation of flexible and rollable displays. Plastic Logic’s manufacturing plant in Dresden, Germany, which develops, manufactures and sells a range of flexible, electrophoretic displays (EPD), will operate independently under the name Plastic Logic Germany. “FlexEnable has been created from Plastic Logic’s people and its technology assets in Cambridge, UK,” explained Indro Mukerjee, Plastic Logic’s Chairman. “Based on Plastic Logic’s full technology and patent portfolio. FlexEnable will independently provide expertise, technology and products to system builders, device makers and product companies to enable innovative, volume products.” “I believe that the full potential of plastic electronics is now emerging as transformational developments in flexible transistor performance and bold, new concepts drive more and more applications,” said Mukerjee. “This, combined with the proven manufacturability and scalability of our transistor technology platform, makes this a defining moment for the industry”. According to Mukerjee the capability has reached the point where it is possible to be able to manufacture arrays with millions of perfect flexible transistors across areas of any size and shape and in high volumes. The Plastic Logic flexible transistor platform has now been industrially proven to be able to form active backplanes for LCD, OLED, EPD and other display media and has been successfully broadened to be able to enable solutions for sensors and integrated systems on fully-flexible, plastic. Being able to create flexible electronics on plastic will enable the technology to provide transformational benefits for product shape, weight, and durability and enables a path to low-cost solutions for high volumes which is perfectly suited to match the requirements of markets for wearables, new mobile devices and distributed, flexible sensors for IoT applications. FlexEnable’s process is low temperature (<100°C) which opens up a host of manufacturing and cost benefits. www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe February 2015 11


EETE FEB 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above