Page 51

EETE FEB 2016

A46E_EETimesEuro_2_375x10_875_A45.qxd 10/29/1 MEMS technologies & environmental sensors DC-3 Series Omron’s plan to cover Earth with IoTs DC-1 Series A By R. Colin Johnson few years ago Hewlett Packard had the idea of covering the world with sensors HiQP Series DC-DC CONVERTERS NEW!! HIGH INPUT VOLTAGES UP TO 900 VDC. DC-1 Series • 120-370 VDC input voltage range • 5-300 VDC regulated isolated outputs • Up to 300 watts output power • 4.5” X 2.5” X 0.50” encapsulated package • DC-3 Series • 300-900 VDC input voltage range • 3.3 -300 VDC regulated isolated outputs • Up to 50 watts, single and dual outputs • Thru hole and terminal strip models • HiQP Series • 125-475 VDC input voltage range • 24-200 VDC regulated isolated outputs • Up to 50 watts output power • 2.50” X 1.55” X 0.50” encapsulated package ALL MODELS AVAILABLE WITH EXPANDED OPERATING TEMPERATURES SELECTED MILITARY SCREENING CUSTOM DESIGNS For full characteristics of these and the entire PICO product line, see PICO’s Full line catalog at www.picoelectronics.com PICOELECTRONICS, Inc. Pico Representatives Germany ELBV/Electronische Bauelemente Vertrieb E-mail: info@elbv.de Phone: 0049 89 4602852 Fax: 0049 89 46205442 England Ginsbury Electronics Ltd. E-mail: rbennett@ginsbury.co.uk Phone: 0044 1634 298900 Fax: 0044 1634 290904 to create a central nervous system for the Earth. Now Omron (Kyoto, Japan) has picked up the ball and invented the technologies to make that dream a reality in its description of new sensors and the infrastructure to tie them into a coherent whole at the Trillion Sensors Summit (TSensors 2015) in Celebration, Fla. It all started before even the mass-market popularity of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors, when Omron won the contract to install three million ball-in-tube accelerometers inside the gas meters around the most earthquake prone areas of Japan. The idea was to sense the severity of their almost daily seismic activity and shut down the gas to homes that may have been damaged enough to potentially have gas leaks, thus averting what are called secondary disasters after earthquakes—in this case gas fires and explosions. “In Japan we have many earthquakes,” Yoshi Sekiguchi, senior general manager of Micro Devices at Omron Corporation headquarters told the attendees in his presentation at (TSensors 2015). “However, the secondary disasters, such as tsunami’s and fires, are often more serious than the original.” Yoshio Sekiguchi, senior general manager of Micro Devices at Omron Corporation headquarters speaks at the TSensors Summit 2015. (Source: EE Times/R. Colin Johnson) Most buildings in Japan—even skyscrapers—have elaborate earthquake protection measures. Besides extra steel reinforcement inside concrete, some even go to the extreme of mounting their foundations on gigantic spring-like structures to allow the foundation to remain intact even with extreme swaying that would cause most buildings to collapse. “Throughout Japan we have 4,377 seismic sensors already, but that is not nearly enough,” Sekiguchi said. “What were need are much smaller, higher accuracy, lower cost systems to expand the network.” As mentioned, Omron already has three million earthquake detectors in gas meters in Japan, but now they are moving beyond the outdated moving ball technology. To upgrade, down size and lower the cost of deploying millions more seismic sensors. Omron turned to its now time-proven MEMS foundry for three axis accelerometers are build, then added built-in algorithms to filter, integrate and spectrally recognize the signature of the most dangerous earthquakes, according to Sekiguchi. Omron’s proposal, besides upgrading the existing ball-based gas meter sensors, is to also build the same platform—with slight modifications, into electric meters— to shut off electricity to prevent electrical fires, plus provide battery powered backup monitoring to continue monitoring tremors in order to maintain situational awareness of all disaster aftermaths. As the ultimate solution to a central nervous system for mother Earth, Omron has also created a seismic monitor that also tracks temperature, humidity, pres- Downsized MEMS accelerometer with added wireless connectivity so that both gas and electricity can be cut off to damaged households, plus emergency responders can quickly ascertain where the most damage was done and thus where to send rescue operations first. (Source: Omron) www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe February 2016 43


EETE FEB 2016
To see the actual publication please follow the link above