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UHF RFID development platform operates sensors and actuators Farsens’ Medusa development platform allows developers to design components driven by RF energy harvesting through the use of UHF RFID battery-free devices. The Medusa includes an ANDY100 chip with EPC C1G2 communication and a MSPG2233IPW20 microcontroller from Texas Instruments for communication with developers’ circuits. Users can now develop their own wireless sensors or actuators without requiring batteries on the tag. The Medusa harvests energy from the RF field created by the RFID reader to power up the ANDY100 IC, the microcontroller and the circuitry and devices attached to it. The ANDY100 chip included works under standard EPC C1G2 commands so no proprietary or custom commands are needed. Any commercial UHF RFID reader can be used just by programing with the correct standard commands. Farsens S.L. www.farsens.com Bluetooth 4.1 network processor shrinks to 2.6x2.6mm STMicroelectronics has released the latest version of its BlueNRG Bluetooth SMART network processor, which supports the latest Bluetooth version 4.1 enhancements and introduces 1.7V operation for longer-lasting battery-powered applications. The device integrates a complete Bluetooth PHY and 2.4GHz radio, ARM Cortex-M0 microcontroller running the Bluetooth 4.1 protocol stack, and dedicated AES-128 security coprocessor. The API, power management, and Flash are already integrated, allowing direct connection to the application host controller using a simple SPI bus leveraging clear software partitioning between network processor and host microcontroller. The new Bluetooth 4.1 specification further increases energy efficiency and supports dual-mode topologies containing devices operating as both master and slave. The new Low- Duty-Cycle Directed Advertising minimizes energy consumed when connecting to known devices. In addition, Bluetooth 4.1 introduces Logical Link Control and Adaptation Protocol (L2CAP), which enables flexible data exchanges leveraging multi-channel communications and quality of service. ST’s BlueNRG-MS network processor can power devices such as a hub capable of collecting sensor data and subsequently acting as a peripheral to transfer the data to a smart phone. It can also allow very large sensor networks with unlimited communication range, controlled by a single smartphone. Moreover, BlueNRG-MS supports the latest moves towards IP-based connectivity added to Bluetooth 4.1, which enables developers to target future opportunities in the Internet of Things. BlueNRG-MS is available now in a 5x5x1mm QFN32 package, but will soon be available in a chip scale packaging option measuring only 2.6x2.6x0.56mm. STMicroelectronics www.st.com Module extends HiL testing and rapid prototyping to CAN FD Along with a new plug-on module for its Hardware-in-theloop test and rapid prototyping systems, dSpace’s test software release 2014-B now supports CAN FD, the automotive data bus with extended bandwidth. An FPGA in the plug-on module enables this device to shoulder future requirements. The DS4342 CAN FD Interface Module can be integrated into dSPACE RCP systems such as MicroAutoBox and the company’s modular hardware for HIL systems. The module features two CAN FD channels that can also be used for communication across the standard version of the CAN bus. For large numbers of CAN FD channels, up to 4 DS4342 modules can be integrated on a DS4505 carrier board, which is also used for FlexRay communication. It is possible to combine FlexRay and CAN FD interface modules on the same carrier board. This enables users to add CAN or CAN FD to existing systems, thereby protecting their investment. Similar to current CAN applications, CAN FD communication is configured via the RTI CAN MultiMessage Blockset with its graphical user interface. Familiarity with this configuration software will enable developers to quickly add CAN-FD-specific information to their application. The CAN FD bus standard offers higher bandwidth than the established CAN protocol. The higher payload data packet size of 64 bytes also increases the bus system’s efficiency without scarifying the benefits of a classic CAN such as flexibility and affordability. dSpace www.dspace.com InvenSense adds multicore CPU to motion sensor Fabless MEMS company InvenSense Inc. (San Jose, Calif.) has announced its next motion sensor with integrated processing, the ICM-30630 which includes a multi-axis inertial MEMS sensor and multi-core processor. The sensor hub integrates 3-axis accelerometer with 3-axis gyroscope MEMS sensors together with tri-core CMOS microcontroller, embedded flash and SRAM and software. It does this in a package that measures 3mm by 3mm by 1mm. The processor cores are a Cortex-M0 and two digital motion processors of InvenSense own design, the DMP3 and DMP4. The DMP3 offloads all motion processing tasks form the CPU and provides physical and virtual sensor output at low power. The DMP4 takes on more computationally intensive tasks, again relieving the host CPU and reducing power consumption. The Cortex-M0 performs sensor management via an integrated RTOS and provides an “open platform” that is programmable allowing custom features. The result improves acquisition and processing of sensor data from internal and external sensors and reduces “always on” power consumption. The ICM-30630 is compliant with Android Lollipop, and other operating systems, while supporting multiple application processor platforms. The ICM-30630 will sample 1H15. InvenSense Inc. www.invensense.com 44 Electronic Engineering Times Europe January 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE JAN 2015
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