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EETE JAN 2016

PUBLISHER André Rousselot +32 27400053 andre.rousselot@eetimes.be Editor-in-Chief Julien Happich +33 169819476 julien.happich@eetimes.be EDITORS Christoph Hammerschmidt +49 8944450209 chammerschmidt@gmx.net Peter Clarke +44 776 786 55 93 peter.clarke@eetimes.be Paul Buckley +44 1962866460 paul@activewords.co.uk Jean-Pierre Joosting +44 7800548133 jean-pierre.joosting@eetimes.be Circulation & Finance Luc Desimpel luc.desimpel@eetimes.be Advertising Production & Reprints Lydia Gijsegom lydia.gijsegom@eetimes.be Art Manager Jean-Paul Speliers Acounting Ricardo Pinto Ferreira Regional Advertising Representatives Contact information at: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/en/ about/sales-contacts.html ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TIMES EUROPE is published 11 times in 2016 by European Busines Pres SA Chaussée de Louvain 533, 1380 Lasne, Belgium Tel: +32-2-740 00 50 Fax: +32-2-740 00 59 email: info@eetimes.be. www.electronics-eetimes.com VAT Registration: BE 461.357.437. Company Number: 0461357437 RPM: Nivelles. Volume 18, Issue 1 EE Times P 304128 It is free to qualified engineers and managers involved in engineering decisions – see: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/subscribe © 2016 E.B.P. SA All rights reserved. P 304128 european business press last word from infotainment systems in a car. Unfortunately, building an IoT product is not as simple as just connecting your product to the internet. And while it is tempting to rush to try to be first to market, quicker does not mean safer. The security and privacy issues raised by connected products are often subtle and complex. Any business looking to design and deploy applications must wrap a robust security policy around data security every decision. For companies with limited resources, IoT platforms-as-aservice can address many of the security and data integrity issues that riddle poorly designed IoT products. Such tools let you streamline secure communications based on industry-standard encryption protocols and extend fine-grained user provisioning to IoT products. This will also improve time to market, whilst also avoiding a rude awakening in the future. Quantum cryptography can be hacked RBy Jean-Pierre Joosting esearchers from Linköping University and Stockholm University have discovered that energytime entanglement — the method that today forms the basis for many systems of quantum cryptography — is vulnerable to attack. “With this security hole, it’s possible to eavesdrop on traffic without being detected. We discovered this in our theoretical calculations, and our colleagues in Stockholm were subsequently able to demonstrate it experimentally,” says Jan-Åke Larsson, professor at Linköping University’s Division of Information Coding. Quantum cryptography is considered a completely safe method for information transfer, and theoretically it should be impossible to crack. Many research groups around the world are working to make quantum cryptography resistant to various types of disturbance, and so far it has been possible to handle the disturbance that has been detected. Quantum cryptography technology is commercially available, but there is much doubt as to whether it is actually used. “It’s mostly rumours, I haven’t seen any system in use. But I know that some universities have test networks for secure data transfer,” says Prof Larsson. The energy-time entanglement technology for quantum encryption studied here is based on testing the connection at the same time as the encryption key is created. Two photons are sent out at exactly the same time in different directions. At both ends of the connection is an interferometer where a small phase shift is added. This provides the interference that is used to compare similarities in the data from the two stations. If the photon stream is being eavesdropped there will be noise, and this can be revealed using a theorem from quantum mechanics — Bell’s inequality. On the other hand if the connection is secure and free from noise, you can use the remaining data, or photons, as an encryption key to protect your message. What the LiU researchers JanÅke Larsson and his doctoral student Jonathan Jogenfors have revealed about energy-time entanglement is that if the photon source is replaced with a traditional light source, an eavesdropper can identify the key, the code string. Consequently they can also read the message without detection. The security test, which is based on Bell’s inequality, does not react — even though an attack is underway. Physicists at Stockholm University have subsequently been able to demonstrate in practical experiments that it is perfectly possible to replace the light source and thus also eavesdrop on the message. But this problem can also be solved. “In the article we propose a number of countermeasures, from simple technical solutions to rebuilding the entire machine,” explains Jonathan Jogenfors. The article has been published in Science Advances. 50 Electronic Engineering Times Europe January 2016 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE JAN 2016
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