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EETE JULAUG 2014

Borrill:: At the moment there are several different schemes being evaluated by different companies and being proposed. But even the standards body for 5G has not selected a waveform yet, and part of that is that even the operators haven’t set the requirements yet. We don’t even have a requirements document for 5G. We certainly don’t have a standard of what waveform will be used. Many universities and research institutions are investigating different waveforms. There are several waveform candidates that seem very popular at the moment. We also don’t know exactly which ones will be chosen in the end but there are some clear candidates which we are looking at. One of them is called FBMC - Filter Bank Multi-Carrier. This is probably the top technology that has been discussed as a waveform, and then there are some variations on that as well. EE Times Europe: Does the 5G development already have an influence to your business? Borrill: We are certainly excepting the business to start this year. If we look at the research projects in the industry, it is starting from now. The fundamental research in terms of waveforms, modulation, devices, wider bandwidth of device, higher sensitivity devices - all this fundamental research takes place now. EE Times Europe: Are there any flagship projects or institutions that are leading the pack? Borrill: There is one project that is called the 5G innovation centre, 5GIC, led by the University of Surrey in England, and there are many industrial participants. There is the METIS project, an industry collaboration, and there are some EU-driven projects. EE Times Europe: How would you assess the role of Europe in this technology - will the business be driven more by Asian companies as this is the case in 3G and 4G? Borrill: It seems that the reason for the EU funding is that the EU governments want to try to recover the business back to Europe. For mobile phones, in GSM, 3G and Wideband CDMA Europe really led the world in the technology. In LTE Europe lost this leading position. There are governments that seem determined to bring that technology back to Europe; in particular the British and German government who signed an agreement to do joint developments so we can rebuild our expertise, build the telecommunications industry. We regard this as very positive. Crunch the IoT data before it clogs your network By Julien Happich In today’s IoT frenzy, a lot of companies rush to connect sensors and provide all sorts of monitoring services, and carriers will happily bill them for the data that transit through their networks. But sending all the raw data to the cloud for processing and intelligence is inefficient and expensive notes Paul Glynn, CEO of Irish startup Davra Networks. With the release of its RuBAN application enablement platform, the 3-year old Irish company jumps on the “fog computing” bandwagon with a clear goal to add local value to IoT data before it even reaches the cloud. “Out of the estimated 50 billion connected devices that may be deployed by 2020, the vast majority will not have a direct connection to the cloud but will pass on their data through local gateways or routers” explains Glynn. “Often, most of the generated data is irrelevant, a sensor may indicate it’s still operational, or that the values it monitor remain unchanged, and that data could be dumped”, he told EETimes Europe. While a lot of network and mobile operators see the IoT as an opportunity to sell more SIM cards and data plans, Glynn presents the cloud-based RuBAN platform as a way to build new data services while focusing on data reduction. In Davra’s solution, data is gathered, filtered and managed near its source, and only relevant information is sent to the cloud to be turned into insightful business intelligence, calling for action. Following Cisco’s fog computing concept, simple sets of rules running on the gateways’ embedded computers can enable local intelligence. “That way, networks evolve beyond object connectivity, to data services”, says Glynn. “Last year, Cisco would have supplied a router, but now they offer routers bundled with data services” he added. “For example, our solution is already implemented in a large fleet of school buses operating in rural areas, in Texas. A gateway onboard each bus provides WiFi for the passengers, but it also aggregates engine data for driver behavior monitoring, it logs speed and traffic density, the actual position of the bus, and all these information enable us to build new data services that largely pay for the WiFi installation alone.” “As computing power goes to the edges of the network, data analysis has a bigger role to play at the edge” continues Glynn. “With the RuBAN platform, it is as if we were dropping a virtual network engineer at gateway level to act upon the data flow and decide remotely and on-the-fly what makes sense to be routed further and what should be dumped to reduce the stream of data”. The RuBAN platform can presents the data on any connected interface, it requires no customization and also handles automated network troubleshooting, response and problem repair remotely. It can be used to connect many different industries horizontally, while the granularity of each data analysis solution is based on the customer’s specific requirements, established locally. In the future, this sort of data intelligence could even become an integral part of software defined networks. www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe July/August 2014 19


EETE JULAUG 2014
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