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EETE JULAUG 2015

rate occasionally and tend to transmit small data volumes. EETE:: There are special networks for this, such as Sigfox. RS: Many services that currently feature proprietary wireless technology will be implemented with 5G in the future. Mass production makes powerful platforms very affordable; proprietary technology is always costly. That is why applications with direct connections between user devices could be better implemented with LTE in the future. The standard already provides for this; but it is not well supported by network operators. The automotive industry is also pushing into this field with car to X (C2X) applications. You need very low latency when security related C2X services come to the point of being able to transmit to their environments, for example when a car reports, “Caution, I’m braking”. In this case, the car should not have to first establish a connection with its network operator. The technologies currently under development with 5G would be able to do that. But we will have to wait to see what the business models look like. We expect that more applications will be implemented with 5G technologies than is possible in mobile communications networks today. It remains to be seen, however, how many of these functions will ultimately be available in mobile phones. From a test and measurement standpoint, it is more of a technology issue. We have to handle bandwidths and latencies and implement what the standardization bodies specify. These are matters of modulation modes and physical levels. The physical layer is being redefined, and we naturally have to implement this in our products as well. But we already have T&M instruments that work at 60 GHz and can generate and receive the code. Seeing that the market is very small at the moment, everything is still relatively costly. But that will change. A return to expensive lab instruments is out of the question for production test and measurement equipment. But we have five or six years to develop suitable solutions before mass production begins. Executive interview Rohde & Schwarz’ Munich-headquarters. EETE: Rohde & Schwarz has a branch that deals with security technology. Could this produce synergies associated with IoT? Security, encryption and authentication are also being intensely discussed in the IoT world. RS: There are definitely synergies among our various activities, but it is not so much a matter of being able to offer a “security measurement instrument”. For example, network operators have asked us to analyze exactly what smartphones apps do. Many apps communicate in the background. The question is what transmission bandwidths they use and how much network capacity they consume. The individual apps are not really coordinated and naturally require a certain transmission capacity. Even when only a few bits are transmitted, the need to connect and disconnect many times consumes a lot of resources. Network operators need to know what is happening. App behavior is also important to IT security personnel. They want to know which servers and services these apps connect to and what data they transmit. The extensive expertise that is compiled in the Rohde & Schwarz group of companies has gone into the software in our products. It is possible to determine what kind of data a mobile phone is currently transmitting and via which servers without involving the phone user. There is demand for this on the market, for network traffic classification or how to detect anomalies, for example. The apps that tax the battery the most can be identified. That of course goes beyond the boundaries of conventional radiocommunications test equipment. EETE: Government security agencies are now combating cybercrime. Does this open up new business opportunities for you? For instance, detecting apps that install malware without users knowing it? RS: I don’t want to claim that our instruments will tell you that, but they do offer the possibility to view such processes in the first place. There are also unmeasurable aspects that play a role in analyzing measurement results. For example, the question of whether you have a “good” or “bad” server and where it is located. We simulate base stations and allow instruments to connect to the Internet in order to analyze data traffic. A user can assess how little or how much data an app is using and see how actively it is transmitting. EETE: When designing T&M instruments, there is a visible trend toward moving control and evaluation logic to intelligent Taking on the 5G challenge: Millimeter wave measurement site from R&S. 18 Electronic Engineering Times Europe July-August 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE JULAUG 2015
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