Page 4

EETE JUN 2014

Next-gen MOST data bus brings Gigabit networking to the car Christoph Hammerschmidt Automotive data networking is on the move: Ethernet AVB is conquering more and more domains in today’s and, even more so, tomorrow’s vehicles - except one: infotainment seems to remain the mainstay of the MOST data bus. The MOST - Media-Oriented Systems Transport - has come somewhat under pressure, but the recent meeting of the industry around the MOST ecosystem proved that the technology is alive and well. Microchip as the company that currently dominates the silicon for the infotainment data bus is even sketching a roadmap for the future, with a 5 Gbit/s broadband in-car networking becoming an option for the next generation of cars. In his keynote speech, Microchip COO Ganesh Moorthy claimed that the MOST ecosystem is continuing to grow. Currently, 165 car models with about 150 million nodes are utilising the technology with its characteristic ring architecture. The latest high-profile roll-out of MOST-equipped vehicles, the Audi A3 and the current Mercedes-Benz S-Class, already took place several months ago, but right in time for this year’s MOST Forum, Hyundai announced to employ MOST for its new Genesis top-of-the-line model. Like Audi and Daimler, Hyundai plans will use the bandwidth of the current MOST150 generation to enable living-room video quality in automotive (rear seat) infotainment; additional features will be internet access, an interface for Apple’s Siri voice control technology and in-car WiFi. According to Moorthy, currently further design wins are in the offing, but he declined to elaborate. Moorthy also denied that the MOST ecosystem is under pressure from Ethernet AVB. “There is no market share for Ethernet”, he said. “All of the infotainment that is deployed in cars today is MOST-based” - a statement that might be somewhat exaggerated, but hits the nail on the head in that in-car Ethernet today indeed is used almost exclusively to either connect cameras to Driver Assistant Systems or to flash data into their respective ECUs at the end of the production line or during maintenance. What Moorthy said is basically that Ethernet AVB and MOST are not competing against each other, at least not head-on, but instead that there are use different cases for both Ethernet AVB and MOST. In future vehicle generations the MOST bus will not only serve the demand for distributing digital high quality audio and video signals within the vehicles. Instead, it will have to deal with additional tasks and requirements, mostly Microchip COO Ganesh Moorthy steers the MOST bus into a 5 Gbps future. related to even higher video quality (up to 4K video in the next generations of cars) with multi-seat and split-view capability, harmonized communication links and further integration of consumer electronics devices. Most of these wish list items from carmakers will translate into higher bandwidth requirements. The MOST roadmap takes these requirements into account: The next evolution step in the roadmap is now the ‘Universal Gigabit Network’ (UGN), a technology that supports an impressive range of interfaces and services, including Mipi, PCI and USB. It Evolution into the future: the next generation of the MOST bus will offer unprecedented bandwidth along with a cost-effective coax PHY. 4 Electronic Engineering Times Europe June 2014 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE JUN 2014
To see the actual publication please follow the link above