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Follow-us on @EETimesEurope Sonar drives gesture recognition startup Startup Chirp Microsystems Inc. (Albany, Calif.) was founded late in 2013 to commercialize research into the use of a piezoelectric ultrasound transducer array to capture depth information and gesture recognition. The company is led by co-founder and CEO Michelle Meng- Hsuing Kiung, a former executive with the Micron Technology Inc. (Boise, Idaho) imaging group, now Aptina Imaging Inc. The company claims on its website that the use of sound waves to locate moving objects is more energy efficient than trying to recognize then from an image sensor. The company compares a camera consuming 1W to record video while the Chirp transducer consumes 400-microwatts to perform 3D range finding. The micro-machined ultrasound transducer and its companion ASIC work by driving an array of silicon membranes in the MEMS device to emit an ultrasonic wave from the device and then uses the membranes in a microphone mode – to detect the return signal. The use of time-of-flight information from the array of sensors allows calculation of the distance and direction and the build-up a 3D depth map in front of the sensor. Chirp Microsystems Inc. www.chirpmicro.com More ears for the NSA: GSM monitoring receiver The latest member of Pentek’s Cobalt family, Model 52663 is a full spectrum GSM channelizer 3U VPX module running a highly-optimized IP core for the Xilinx Virtex-6 FPGA. The unit is fit for mobile monitoring systems that must capture some or all of the 1100 uplink and downlink signals in both upper and lower GSM bands. This full global system for mobile communications spectrum monitoring targets homeland security, government and military applications. Designed for GSM phone signal interception, Model 52663 accepts four analog inputs from an external analog RF tuner, such as the Pentek Model 8111, where the GSM RF bands are down converted to an IF frequency. These IF signals are then digitized by four A/D converters and routed to four channelizer banks, which perform digital downconversion of all GSM channels to baseband. Two of the banks handle 175 channels for the lower GSM transmit/receive bands and two banks handle 375 channels for the upper bands. The DDC channels within each bank are equally spaced at 200 kHz. Each DDC output is re-sampled to a 4x symbol rate of 1.08333 MHz to simplify symbol recovery. Every four DC outputs are combined into a frequency-division “superchannel” that allows transmission of all 1100 channels across the PCIe Gen 2 x8 interface. Pentek www.pentek.com www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe June 2014 45


EETE JUN 2014
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