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also promises to further stabilize the dominant position of MOST in the infotainment domain by supporting uncompressed video streaming at a bandwidth of up to 5 Gbps. In contrast to packet-oriented technologies such as Ethernet, video streaming allows for perfect video and audio synchronity and lower latency times. The latter aspect becomes important where safety-relevant signals are transmitted across the network - for instance cameras that connect to ADAS. At the physical layer, coax cabling will dominate, taking the place of POF and UTP in earlier versions. Coax would open the potential to significant cost reductions, Moorthy said. In addition, it enables power-over-coax schemes which would reduce cabling complexity. Exact data as to the timing for a roll-out were not given. “We have to think ahead of the automotive OEMs next-generation requirements,” Moorthy hinted. It remains unclear to which extend optical technologies will have a place in Microchip’s vision of the future. At the meeting, Sumitomo demonstrated an all-glass-fibre physical layer for MOST which would meet automotive requirements and provide the 5 Gbps bandwidth required by the UGN vision - only that according to Moorthy’s presentation UGN will no longer provides for glass fibre which triggered some frowning in the POF camp. Seamless interoperability with consumer electronics devices will be another major concern of the MOST technologists. Already supporting a wide range of standard interface technologies Universal Plug-and-Play does not stop short of the vehicle infotainment, as was demonstrated by the FZI research centre. like I2C, SPI, or USB, future MOST bus systems will also connect to MIPI and GMII (Gigabit Media Independent Interface) devices. At a higher protocol level, Universal Plug-and-Play will also be supported. At the meeting, the FZI research institute from Karlsruhe demonstrated how a smartphone or tablet could be used to access certain vehicle functions - for example, controlling media content transfers from the user to the infotainment system or controlling the HVAC through a customisable user interface. The approach ties the smartphone even closer to the in-car electronics landscape; a discussion on how this can be done without compromising security will become unavoidable. Report: Europe can shine in global electronic production By Peter Clarke China may be the leader in electronic equipment production but rising demand for automotive, industrial and aerospace electronics will see Europe and North America benefit over the next five years, according to Decision Etude Conseil. Global electronics production, valued at more than €1.410 trillion (about US$1.96 trillion) in 2012, will show a compound annual growth rate of 3.2 percent over the period to 2017 when the market will reach €1.655 trillion (about US$2.30 trillion), according to the market analysis firm. However, while North America, Europe and Japan have lost a large share of equipment manufacturing to China over the last ten years, it is now China’s turn to feel the pressure from emerging economies. And with rising demand for high value professional electronics in industrial, automotive and aerospace applications there is an opportunity for North America, Europe and Japan over the next five years. At the end period under study China will still be the largest manufacturer of electronic equipment at 36 percent of global supply, but will have lost market share, down from 2012. North America, Europe and Japan have already lost most of the world’s computer, communications and consumer electronics production but the situation is now relatively stable, the report suggests Other sectors such as strategic aerospace and military production, industrial, automotive and medical equipment production is less likely to migrate and it will be China, having emerged as the leading producer, that will come under pressure from other territories such as India, Vietnam and Malaysia. Indeed at the end of the period under study the annual growth of production of electronic equipment will be higher in all of North America, Europe and Japan, than in China, which will be languishing down at 1.8 percent, Decision predicts. To see how fortunes can change within a decade consider that in 2002 North America, Europe and Japan still controlled about 66 percent of global electronic equipment production. In 6 Electronic Engineering Times Europe June 2014 www.electronics-eetimes.com


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