Page 66

EETE MAR 2015

Save me from overbearing IoT analytics By WPeter Clarke ill Internet of Things analytics drive us all to drink? Almost everything we do of significance is becoming electronically enabled and recorded. And with the advent of the Internet of Things that is trickling down to even the most basic things — like opening a bottle. A printed tag on a bottle that can be read wirelessly to check whether the bottle is sealed or opened, its position in the supply chain and pass the information up to the cloud: is this technology looking for a problem to solve? I am sure there are legitimate cost- and energy-saving applications for such technology. But the most excited praise from the company developing the technology, Thin Film Electronics ASA (Oslo, Norway), is reserved for the idea that early customer Diageo plc, the vendor of Johnnie Walker Blue Label Scotch Whiskey, can use the information to send texts and emails to consumers. Thin Film says Diageo likes the OpenSense technology because it can send marketing messages encouraging consumers to: A) hurry up and open the bottle they have bought which is as yet unopened, pointing out upcoming occasions when whisky could be drunk. OR B) hurry up and finish the opened bottle of whisky with tips on what to mix the whisky with etc. AND C) seamlessly buy their next bottle of Scotch whisky or some other tipple sold by Diageo. Many people have said that the money Thinfilm’s OpenSense tag implementation. “There’s no doubt the Internet changes everything but I doubt that humans will adapt that quickly to being forever monitored by their possessions.” to be made in the Internet of Things will be in the data that is analyzed and acted upon. But some of the more frivolous applications of this technology feel like an intrusive waste of energy. Already we are hearing about consumer distrust of televisions that eavesdrop on all living room conversations and pass them up the cloud to act as training information for better vocal command recognition. Similarly the idea is out there that social media flows are machine-monitored so that when you say you are heading out to eat, some Internet-based service can suggest restaurants close to you. There’s no doubt the Internet changes everything but I doubt that humans will adapt that quickly to being forever monitored by their possessions. To be honest it is enough to make me turn to drink — but I want an alcoholic beverage that is “off the grid.” PUBLISHER André Rousselot +32 27400053 andre.rousselot@eetimes.be Editor-in-Chief Julien Happich +33 169819476 julien.happich@eetimes.be EDITORS Christoph Hammerschmidt +49 8944450209 chammerschmidt@gmx.net Peter Clarke +44 776 786 55 93 peter.clarke@eetimes.be Paul Buckley +44 1962866460 paul@activewords.co.uk Jean-Pierre Joosting +44 7800548133 jean-pierre.joosting@eetimes.be Circulation & Finance Luc Desimpel luc.desimpel@eetimes.be Advertising Production & Reprints Lydia Gijsegom lydia.gijsegom@eetimes.be Art Manager Jean-Paul Speliers Acounting Ricardo Pinto Ferreira Regional Advertising Representatives Contact information at: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/en/ about/sales-contacts.html ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TIMES EUROPE is published 11 times in 2015 by European Busines Pres SA 7 Avenue Reine Astrid, 1310 La Hulpe, Belgium Tel: +32-2-740 00 50 Fax: +32-2-740 00 59 email: info@eetimes.be. www.electronics-eetimes.com VAT Registration: BE 461.357.437. Company Number: 0461357437 RPM: Nivelles. Volume 17, Issue 3 EE Times P 304128 It is is free to qualified engineers and managers involved in engineering decisions – see: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/subscribe © 2015 E.B.P. SA All rights reserved. P 304128 european business press 50 Electronic Engineering Times Europe March 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE MAR 2015
To see the actual publication please follow the link above