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DESIGN & PRODUCTS AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS Gearbox accommodates optional electric drive Together, automotive supplier ZF Friedrichshafen and car manufacturer Porsche have developed an eight-speed dual-clutch transmission. The special thing about this gearbox: It can accommodate a hybrid module as an option, accommodating an electric motor without affecting the installation dimensions. One major development goal was to make electric power an option for this transmission: Thanks to a new gear set design, it was possible to integrate a 100 kW hybrid module without increasing the length of the transmission, compared to the current 7DT sports transmission. Another goal was an integrated all-wheel distribution option, driving the front axle in the most fuel-efficient manner possible using a hang-on clutch. Power loss in the basic transmission is reduced by up to 28 percent thanks to several factors, including an optimized electronic transmission control unit (TCU). ZF has customized an already compact hybrid module for the optional variant of the new 8-speed dual clutch transmission. It includes a torsional damper, a separating clutch with actuators as well as the electric motor, and it can be integrated directly into the clutch bell housing. This does not alter the dimensions of the overall transmission but has considerable impact on its properties: With 100 kW peak output, 55 kW continuous power and 400 Nm torque, a vehicle can accelerate up to 140 km/h on pure electric power alone. With this technology, all other hybrid functions are also possible– from recuperation to boost mode. The TCU and the transmission software for the 8DT were developed by ZF independently of the Porsche assignment. The TCU is not integrated, but mounted externally. This prevents the electronics from limiting the transmission sump temperature to a maximum of 150°C. The TCU allows the 8DT interact at high efficiency with other vehicle systems. When operating in ECO mode, the control unit lowers the transmission pressure when driving conditions are suitable to reduce power consumption without impairing comfort or performance. In stopstart mode, the combustion engine can be switched off from a speed of 10 km/h, while the vehicle is rolling to a stop. Coasting with the engine off is possible even at high speeds. ZF Friedrichshafen www.zf.com Secure OTA updates for automotive processors, by ST & Airbiquity STMicroelectronics and Airbiquity, a provider of connected vehicle services, are demonstrating integration of Airbiquity’s software update management service into ST’s telematics and connectivity processors. The demonstration features Airbiquity’s Over-The-Air (OTA) Software & Data Management offering integrated into the ST Telemaco3 Evaluation Board (EVB). Presenting how the technology protects consumers, their automotive investment, and manufacturers, the demo highlights the interoperability between the Airbiquity cloud-based service and the on-board ST Telemaco3 EVB platform in a variety of softwareupdate campaign scenarios and typical Original Equipment Manufacturers’ (OEM) OTA use cases. ST’s Telemaco family of devices provides high bandwidth connectivity (1 Gb/s ETH) and processing capability to handle wireless data management typically required for automotive telematics applications. It can handle the control of the in-vehicle CAN bus through an independent and isolated Cortex-M subsystem running a dedicated real-time OS. Flexible memory and CPU cores configurations allow the implementation of scalable systems. STMicroelectronics www.st.com Windshield interlayer makes glowing head-up display According to a recent report from Nikkei Technology Online, raw materials and chemicals provider Sekisui Chemical Co Ltd demonstrated a novel type of head-up display whose active light-emitting layer could be part of a windshield interlayer. Exhibited at Tokyo’s Automotive World 2017 last January, the prototype head-up display consisted of a thin interlayer embedding luminescent materials sandwiched between two glass plates. Upon being hit by a laser light from a projector hidden beneath (integrated in the dashboard or in the instrument panel), the luminescent material glows and re-creates the image across the windshield. Because the light-emitting material can be invisibly embedded across the whole windshield, with an appropriate projector mechanism the head up display could span the whole windshield. Sekisui Chemical envisages that the same laser projector could light up displays across different glass panels, including side and rear windows or even the sunroof (either to display information or customized lighting patterns). The Japanese company has developed blue and green hues and is now working on obtaining red in the mix. It anticipates that such a display solution could be used in construction or at bus stops, targeting the automotive market once the technology is more mature. Sekisui Chemical www.sekisuichemical.com www.sonitron.be 40 Electronic Engineering Times Europe March 2017 www.electronics-eetimes.com


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