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Using Peer-to-Peer, one of the reader/writers behaves as a tag and creates a communication link. Two NFC devices, perhaps smartphones, can communicate with each other. In Card Emulation mode, NFC devices can replace contactless smartcards. This means that NFC-enabled devices can be used within the existing contactless card infrastructure. Ticketing, access control, transit, tollgates and contactless payments are just a few of the current and upcoming applications. Getting started with NFC NXP has been one of the most notable advocates of NFC in recent years. Silica has worked with the company to create a development platform that will help engineers implement NFC-enabled embedded systems that need no external power source. Instead, energy is harvested from NFC or RFID electromagnetic fields. The ArchiTech Louvre is a demonstration and development board that combines an NXP NTAG I2C tag IC with the NXP LPC11U37 ARM® Cortex™ M0 microcontroller (MCU), and a 2.7 inch, e-ink display. The board comes complete with firmware and Android applications. Software is available under GPL (the General Public License for the GNU operating system). The NTAG I2C is a chip that behaves like a dual-port memory. One port is accessed wirelessly through an NFC interface, the other is accessed by the system via I2C. The active reader – a smartphone – communicates with the passive tag even when the embedded system is powered down. Coupling the NTAG I2C with the low power NXP MCU enables designers to connect the ArchiTech Louvre board to a smartphone then upgrade firmware, read sensors (without consuming power) and exchange data with the MCU. It’s a neat solution for low power RFID applications, with the LPC11U37 ARM® Cortex™ M0 MCU consuming just 85μW/MHz. The e-ink display consumes no The energy, except when it’s being ArchiTech updated. Louvre board. There is also an Arduino connector interface on the board. This means it can be accessed by an external platform for which tens of thousands of apps are readily available. The IoT will be a diverse range of applications for which one size will not fit all when it comes to wireless communications protocols. However, when small size, low power and low cost, combined with high levels of data security are pre-requisites, many of these applications will be best-implemented using NFC technology. It may have been a little while coming, but it’s here now, and here to stay, at least for the foreseeable future. EXCEED YOUR LIMITS! HIGHEND QUALITY ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS www.taiyo-yuden.com Telecommunication, Information, Consumer, Industry and Automotive Electronics www.RZ_TY_electronics-Anzeige_EETimes_eetimes.Electronica14.com indd 1 Electronic Engineering Times Europe November 01.08.14 2014 14:25 17


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