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Keeping pace with real-time big data By CJulien Happich ambridge-based startup Geospock has just secured £3.5M in Series A funding to bring its first product to market, a cloud-based database service with a simple-to-use API for developers to easily integrate real time geotag searches to their applications. Nowadays, machines are generating data at a rate and scale beyond the volumes of human-generated data for which most data bases were originally architected, observes Steve Marsh, CEO and co-founder of GeoSpock. “We are generating much more data than we are generating searches, and current databases are starting to fail or lag behind in terms of real time accessibility” he says. “80% of all data has a geotag attached to it, but often, the geolocation is rapidly changing and in order to be meaningful, it should be continuously updated and searchable in real time”. “Big data is slow data unless it is managed correctly. A new generation of applications use time and place to deliver a customer service. By combining this dynamic data with historical information in real time, companies are in a position to predict demand, manage services geographically and optimise their resources”, explains Marsh, mentioning telematics or mapping services tied to social applications as obvious examples. The startup has developed a very efficient multi-dimensional database that features simultaneous data read and write to increase throughput, and solves the ‘heat map’ problem of large amounts of transient, nearby data. It is specifically designed for the storage, search and retrieval of geospatial data in real-time no matter how big it gets or how often it changes. “A single mobile tower can collect up to 100,000 geotags every second. If telecom companies could monitor every devices in real time, they could offer marketing insights to, says, a supermarket, tell them about which demographics entered the premises, where the customers came from and where they are heading to afterwards. Even as anonymised statistical data, this would be very valuable”, Marsh gave as an example. “Imagine tens of thousands of drones, all having to communicate their position and their sensor data and each having to search for the positions of the others to calculate their geospatial relation to each other for path finding” he mentions as another possible application. “A differentiator is that we can not only search for real time streaming data, but we can also correlate this to historical data to identify anomalous behaviours”. For now, the company is focusing on 2D geospatial information as a first step for its product development, but it says the multidimensional setup of its database could scale up to search efficiently through very complex multidimensional spaces. “Voice identification would require searches across 300 dimensions, potentially, facial identification could require searches across billions of records through data vectors of up to 4000 dimensions”, continues Marsh who conceived the idea while reading for his PhD in Computer Science at Cambridge University. There he was developing a real-time, extreme-scale super computer for simulating human brain function. The company is promoting Version 2.1.0 of its GeoSpock API, enabling customers to create, update and search a large, frequently changing set of objects with geospatial locations (GPS coordinates), held on a database service. The ‘locatables’ objects can be retrieved within a latitude–longitude bounding box, or as the nearest objects to a specified geospatial location. The trackable objects can be assigned types and partitioned into collections too for more focused searches. On its website, GeoSpock claims its database architecture is fit to support billions of locations and receive thousands of concurrent updates every second. The simulation experiment it runs of a large scale social app, tracking 100 million user locations across the world, yields a fifteen fold speed increase compared to a traditional NoSQL database, literally shrinking search response times from minutes to seconds. PUBLISHER André Rousselot +32 27400053 andre.rousselot@eetimes.be Editor-in-Chief Julien Happich +33 169819476 julien.happich@eetimes.be EDITORS Christoph Hammerschmidt +49 8944450209 chammerschmidt@gmx.net Peter Clarke +44 776 786 55 93 peter.clarke@eetimes.be Paul Buckley +44 1962866460 paul@activewords.co.uk Jean-Pierre Joosting +44 7800548133 jean-pierre.joosting@eetimes.be Circulation & Finance Luc Desimpel luc.desimpel@eetimes.be Advertising Production & Reprints Lydia Gijsegom lydia.gijsegom@eetimes.be Art Manager Jean-Paul Speliers Accounting Ricardo Pinto Ferreira Regional Advertising Representatives Contact information at: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/en/ about/sales-contacts.html ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TIMES EUROPE is published 11 times in 2015 by European Busines Pres SA Chaussée de Louvain 533, 1380 Lasne, Belgium Tel: +32-2-740 00 50 Fax: +32-2-740 00 59 email: info@eetimes.be. www.electronics-eetimes.com VAT Registration: BE 461.357.437. Company Number: 0461357437 RPM: Nivelles. Volume 17, Issue 10 EE Times P 304128 It is free to qualified engineers and managers involved in engineering decisions – see: http://www.electronics-eetimes.com/subscribe © 2015 E.B.P. SA All rights reserved. P 304128 european business press 50 Electronic Engineering Times Europe November 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


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