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Wireless Comunications Solving the challenges of small cell architectures By Tony Lefebvre Stadiums, arenas, other large venues, high rises and dense urban areas need Distributed Antenna Systems (DAS) to provide adequate wireless coverage and capacity for tens of thousands of mobile subscribers. Large venues need DAS technology because the large number of people in a space overwhelms the macro mobile network, leading to poor user experiences or the inability of the network to deliver voice and data services. Hundreds or thousands of subscribers may be simultaneously calling, texting, browsing the web, or uploading or downloading video. Handling these communications successfully requires a high amount of cellular capacity over a large and complex coverage area. In addition to DAS for licensed mobile services, these large venues may also have Wi-Fi services to offload some of the traffic from the mobile network, and these Wi-Fi networks need backhaul. The DAS consists of a main hub or head-end that is linked to one or more mobile operator base stations. The main hub Table 1: Optical multiplexing solutions. aggregates the RF inputs and transmits the cellular signal to remote antennas or radio heads connected by copper or fibre, and those remote units broadcast the cellular signal to specific services areas. The service area (whether a large stadium, high rise or downtown corridor) is divided into sectors, in which a specific frequency band or operator’s service is distributed. There is at least one remote radio head or antenna for each sector of the network. The key to implementing high Tony Lefebvre is Director of Product Management at TE Connectivity www.te.com – He can be reached at Tony.Lefebvre@te.com www.electronics-eetimes.com www.eetsearch.com www.edn-europe.com 34 Electronic Engineering Times Europe October 2013 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE OCT 2013
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