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EETE OCT 2013

more information www.productronica.com/en/2013 coilware and LED production Highlight Segment 2013 20th international trade fair for innovative electronics production messe münchen november 12–15, 2013 www.productronica.com Figure 2: Block diagram showing 12 fibre pairs in a stadium. 36 Electronic Engineering Times Europe October 2013 www.electronics-eetimes.com p13-Ruediger_93x277-EETimesEur_E.indd 1 13.09.13 09:33 bines up to three 3.072Gbps fibre links to a single 9.8304 Gbps (10 Gbps) single-mode fibre pair. SLC is a perfect optical multiplexing solution for neutral host architectures where it is necessary to transport full-band, multi-band RF to a designated service area, such as stadiums or urban core, where there is high sectorisation and capacity strain on the network. The composite 10 Gbps fibre link can be multiplexed by using WDM, CWDM and DWDM to further reduce the amount of fibre utilised. SLC works with any solution that transports at the 3.072 Gbps data rate and offers a 13 dB optical budget (20 dB optical budget optional at 10Gbps data rate). An SLC reduces the fibre needed from up to three fibre pairs (six fibre strands), to a fibre pair (two fibre stands). It can be used with WDM, CWDM, or DWDM to further reduce fibre strands, which can translate in a 150% reduction of the fibre leasing requirements. This approach supports up to 225MHz of RF spectrum transported over a single 10 Gbps fibre pair (two fibre strands). Again, the existing fibre infrastructure can be reused. Solutions in action Much of the cost of deploying a DAS in high capacity areas comes not from the cost of the DAS equipment, but in the cost of the infrastructure and installation. Traditional analog DAS systems require one fibre or fibre pair between each head-end and remote antenna. This one-to-one requirement may lead to dozens of fibres being deployed to support installations with multiple remote or antenna locations. In many stadiums, for example, it is not uncommon for such a system to require 192 fibre pairs for current and anticipated future needs to deliver multi-operator mobile – see figure 1. Pulling fibre and splicing it in the field is extremely expensive. And in this example, can represent roughly $250,000 for this part of the deployment alone. CWDM and DWDM expand the data-carrying capacity of individual fibres and fibre pairs by multiplexing 8 (CWDM) or 80 (DWDM) wavelengths on a single fibre. This, coupled with other pre-terminated fibre innovations, reduces the overall fibre count from 192 pairs to 12 pairs – see figure 2 - cutting the cost of the fibre deployment by more than 80%. In a world where DAS is a key solution for mobile networks, operators want to drive fibre as deep into the network as possible at the lowest possible cost. Optical multiplexing solutions reduce fibre counts dramatically to bring down the cost of network deployment, and make it possible to drive fibre deep into the network with a reasonable expenditure of labour and resources.


EETE OCT 2013
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