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Fig. 4: The emulation facility in Bristol Is Open includes programmable hardware in the form of FPGAs and network processors. and a rich, dedicated connectivity infrastructure. The use of programmable hardware and external interconnectivity will allow users to accurately emulate the functionality and performance of network and computing technologies in scale and use them to synthesize representative complex systems. Exploiting the FPGA’s parallel-processing capabilities and high-speed I/Os, BIO is equipped to emulate current or experimental network technologies and topologies, be they wired or wireless, precisely and at scale. The network emulator uses a vast amount of advanced networking and IT technologies. An FPGA farm, server farm and L2/L3 programmable networking equipment are the main building blocks of the facility, enabling the users to build, experiment with and use various networking technologies in the data plane and control plane, such as virtualization, SDN and NFV, resource/ workload allocation tools and algorithms, etc. The emulator is connected to the BIO city network through 10-, 40- and 100-Gbps ports. The emulated networks can use standard data plane protocols such as Ethernet, OTN and Infiniband, or custom and proprietary protocols, to interconnect with other network domains. The emulator uses Xilinx’s ARM®-based Zynq®-7000 All Programmable SoC platform, a single-chip implementation of processing and FPGA technologies. Algorithm acceleration is one of the target use cases for the Zynq SoC, where computationally intensive tasks for resource allocation, path calculation, load balancing and the like are offloaded to FPGA-based parallel processing. Hardware-assisted network function virtualization is another example of how we use Zynq SoC-based platforms in BIO for running performance-critical virtual network functions (VNFs) such as deep packet inspection, service control and security. Xen-based virtualization of ARM cores additionally facilitates running multiple operating systems on the same SoC chip. In this way, BIO can let multiple operators host their VNFs on the same device, and have shared and/or dedicated access to the parallel hardware computing resources to boost performance. Experimentation as a service The way cities work is changing. Using digital technologies, BIO is creating an open, programmable city that gives citizens more ways to participate in and contribute to the way their city works. We call it “City Experimentation as a Service.” Being open guides our procurement, our data management and the hardware and the software we use. Being open means the stakeholders in BIO proactively share what we learn with other cities, technology companies, universities and citizens. Programmable logic Reader O f f er Open source USB oscilloscopes to grab: 3 units This month, LabNation is giving away three of its Smart- Scope open source USB oscilloscopes, worth 229 Euros each, for EETimes Europe’s readers to win. Successfully funded through Kickstarter last year, the SmartScope is claimed to be the world’s first test equipment designed to run on multiple operating systems and platforms such as smartphones, tablets and PCs. It is powered directly from the host’s USB interface making it suitable for many test and measurement applications far from the workbench. The instrument combines the multiple functions of an oscilloscope, logic analyser and a waveform generator in an aluminium case measuring just 110.0x64.0x24.2mm and weighing only 158 grams. The software provides the user interface and functionality, and can be downloaded from the SmartScope web site. It is available for Android (Google Play Store or LabNation website), Apple Mac OS X, Apple iOS (jailbroken), Microsoft Windows 7, 8 and 10, and Ubuntu and Debian Linux distributions. The oscilloscope provides two analogue channels with a sample rate up to 100 MS/s that provides a -3dB bandwidth of 30 MHz. Input signal range is ±35 V with a 1 MΩ / 1pF impedance and has an 8 bit precision and a maximal resolution of 2,5mV. The logic analyser offers 8 input channel with a user selectable logic level of 3.3 or 5 VDC. The SmartScope application includes a number of standard protocol decoders such as for I2C and SPI in addition to allowing custom decoders to be created. The single channel waveform generator can create arbitrary waveforms with a data rate up to 50 MS/s and an output level from 0 to 3.3 V. A digital output generator provides 4 channels, up to a rate of 100 MS/s at either 3.3 or 5 V. The unit is supplied complete with a mini ‘B’ USB cable, 2 analogue probes, digital cable and probes. www.lab-nation.com Check the reader offer online at www.electronics-eetimes.com 46 Electronic Engineering Times Europe October 2015 www.electronics-eetimes.com


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