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Ultra-Miniature - High Reliability Quartz Crystals, Oscillators and Sensors • Highest shock capability in the industry • Military temperature range and beyond • Ultra-low power consumption • High stability and precision EXTREME INNOVATION High Reliability Crystals and Oscillators • Expert technical support • Designed and manufactured in the USA CX16A Medical Military and Industrial Applications CXOX_A CX16 CXOX/HG/HT CXOMK • Excellent long term aging 24 MHz to 50 MHz Crystal 2.0 x 1.2 x 0.4 mm 16 MHz to 250 MHz Crystal 3.2 x 1.5 x 0.5 mm 32.768 kHz to 160 MHz Oscillator 3.2 x 2.5 mm 32.768 kHz to 200 MHz Oscillator CX11A CX11L/HG CXOMK/HG/HT 6.5 x 5.0 mm High-Shock • High-Temperature • High-Precision Military and Avionics | Industrial | Medical MEETING THE EXTREME DEMANDS OF RAPIDLY EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY AS9100C ISO 9001:2008 STATEK CORPORATION 512 N. Main St., Orange, CA 92868 Tel. 714-639-7810 Fax 714-997-1256 www.statek.com Silver coating of fabric opens up wearable technology By Nick Flaherty Depo siting silver onto clothing fibres to create interconnect could open up huge opportunities in wearable electronics. Researchers at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), led by Dr Chris Hunt, have developed a way to print silver directly onto fibres that allows the interconnect to stretch with the fabric, rather than just screen printing onto a woven surface. The new technique could make integrating electronics into all types of clothing simple, practical and reliable with many potential applications in sports, health, medicine, consumer electronics and fashion, says Hunt. “The technique has many potential applications,” he said. “One particularly exciting area is wearable sensors and antennas which could be used for monitoring, for example checking on patients and vulnerable people; data capture and feedback for soldiers in the field; and performance monitoring in sports. It offers particular benefits over the ‘weaving in’ approach, as the conductive pattern is incorporated within the textile, it ensures that sensors are repeatedly positioned in the same location on the body,” he said. This will lead to improved accuracy of the sensor by preventing sensor misplacement. It also adds a negligible weight and thickness to the clothes and multiple electronic circuits patterns can be placed on a garment in a single setup. As an example, wireless wearable sensors for home monitoring of physiological data of a heart could, for instance, overcome shortcomings of currently available technology such as “Halter monitoring” and significantly improve the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Another example would be for a patient with a motor disorder such as Parkinson’s disease, where the monitoring of physiological movement could facilitate medication titration as the disease progresses. Circuits can be easily printed onto many different types of fabric, including wool which is knitted in tight loops. This is a key difference as it means the interconnect can stretch with the material. The technique involves chemically bonding a nano‐silver layer onto individual fibres to a thickness of 20nm. The conductive silver layer fully encapsulates the fibres and has good adhesion and excellent conductivity at 0.188Ω/sq. The 20nm plating is not enough to carry a significant current, but would be used as the base for copper coating to carry more current. An immediate use for the nanosilver coated fabric is applications such as wound dressings, hygienic clothing and medical applications using the antibacterial properties of silver. For example, it can be used for the fabrication of face masks, surgical gloves and military uniforms where the infection of the wound can have severe effect. The high flexibility of fabric textiles allows them to be employed in the health, leisure and sports industries. But it is the opportunities in fashion and consumer technology, such as incorporating LE D lighting into clothing or having touch-screens on shirt sleeves that is really exciting, says Hunt. Having successfully shown that the additive technique is viable in the lab, NPL is now looking for funding or collaborators to develop a full printed circuit on a textile, which can be tested for flexibility and robustness, for example by putting it through the wash. Once this has been successfully achieved, the scientists will then look to develop prototypes of practical applications. www.electronics-eetimes.com Electronic Engineering Times Europe September 2013 23


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