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EETE SEP 2014

optoelectronics Dimmable bulb requires no dimmer By Paul Buckley Kickstarter -backed inovator Nanoleaf is claiming the world’s first dimmable bulb that does not need a dimmer. In 2013 Nanoleaf introduced Kickstarter to what the company claimed was the world’s most energy efficient light bulb and attracted 5000+ Kickstarter backers. Nanoleaf has used part of the seed funding received from the initial Kickstarter project “to create something that is even more energy efficient and more convenient to use”. The result is the Nanoleaf Bloom, which is a dimmable bulb that aims to encourage more people to adopt energy efficient lighting. The Nanoleaf Bloom claims to be so energy efficient that the device is able to do away with the typical external heat-sink that adds bulk to the LED bulb, making it the most energy efficient LED bulb in the world. Being able to dim down an already energy efficient light bulb will save even more electricity. Nanoleaf says there is no need to purchase additional hardware or generate unnecessary waste. At 100% brightness (10 W), the bulb consumes $1.53 of electricity per year. At 50% brightness (2.5 W), the device costs $0.38/year in electricity, uses only 25% of the full power. At 5% brightness or Night Mode (0.5 W), electricity costs $0.07/year. Low power 8-Megapixel CMOS image sensor captures HD video This addition to Toshiba’s 1.12-micron CIS product series is suited for HD highframe rate image capture and ultra-low-power operation in smartphones and other portable devices. The 1.12-micron back-side illuminated CMOS image sensor (CIS) enables high-performance image capture and video recording for handheld mobile devices. The T4KA3 8-megapixel (MP) sensor targets midrange smartphones, tablets and action cameras with 720p resolution, enabling HD video capture at a rate of 240 equivalent frames per second (fps). The T4KA3 operates at 15% lower power and is significantly smaller in area than Toshiba’s prior 8MP sensor, making it one of the world’s smallest chips at this pixel count and enabling the development of smaller camera modules. In addition, the product incorporates Toshiba Bright Mode technology, which boosts image brightness by up to four times. This capability enables users to continuously record and smoothly play back video on their handheld devices at an fps rate twice that achievable without Bright Mode. Another key feature of the T4KA3 is High Dynamic Range (HDR) technology. While non-HDR cameras take pictures at one exposure level with limited contrast range, losing detail in bright or dark areas of a picture, HDR takes multiple pictures at different exposure levels and intelligently stitches them together. The result is a picture with better image quality and brighter, more natural looking colours. Toshiba’s alternate-row, dual-exposure HDR also reduces motion artefacts and eliminates frame buffer requirements without compromising frame resolution or speed. Optical format of the T4KA3 is 1/4 inch, and pixel count is 3280 (H) x 2464 (V). The sensor has 8 kbit of onetime programmable (OTP) memory for automatically storing two settings of lens shading correction data, and the setting can be quickly changed with a single command to accommodate changing light conditions. Toshiba Electronics Europe www.toshiba-components.com LED-fitted tag operates as UHF RF field detector Equipped with a bright LED, Farsens’ Photon RFID tag operates as a convenient UHF RF field detector tag. Whenever the tag comes close to an RF field source, it harvests energy from the RF field and drives its LED according to the field’s strength. The stronger the RF field in a specific point and orientation, the brighter the LED illuminates. Built in a PCB format, the tag has a detection range up to 3 meters for UHF RFID readers. Photon tags can be used to assess the status of aging RFID implementations. RFID reader and reader antennas deployed several years ago may not perform correctly. The devices help users assess how good the system is performing. Such RF field detectors can also be used to signal activities to users. Entering a specific area may require a certain set of procedures from the user. A sparkling LED could act as a visual indicator and reminder. Farsens S.L. www.farsens.com 44 Electronic Engineering Times Europe September 2014 www.electronics-eetimes.com


EETE SEP 2014
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