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EETE SEP 2015

Electric Automation Systems and Components International Exhibition Nuremberg, Germany, 24 – 26 November 2015 Answers for automation Visit SPS IPC Drives and experience the unique working atmosphere at Europe’s leading exhibition in the field of electric automation: • a comprehensive market overview • more than 1,600 exhibitors including all key players • products and solutions • innovations and trends sps@mesago.com www.sps-exhibition.com Your free entry ticket www.sps-exhibition.com/tickets prototype Cat-1 LTE cards. They consume 23 dBm power to deliver up to 10 Mbits/second data rates compared to the future Cat-M which will hit 20 dBm at rates as low as 200 Kbits/s. A handful of chip designers are sampling Cat-1 products now, including Qualcomm, said Hosain of Aeris. However the modules using the chips are not yet in production, he said. Today’s users don’t want to wait another year for an interim Cat-0 or the ultimate Cat-M products – let alone another five years for an IoT optimized 5G network, he added. Despite the wait, Machina Research predicts as many as 2.2 billion cellular M2M connections will be running in 2024, up from 256 million at end of 2014. LTE will command the majority of those links (54%), followed by 3G at 21%, it said. A 900 MHz version of Wi-Fi for IoT is even further behind. Chips supporting the 802.11ah standard are not expected until 2017 and a certification program for the products won’t be ready until 2018, said Rolf De Vegt, a senior director of technical standards at Qualcomm Atheros. The good news is the 11.ah spec supports a range of up to 1 km, data rates from 150 Kbits/s to 4 Mbits/s using a single stream and a MHz channel, data rates up to about 78 Mbits/s for wider channels and up to four streams. Its transmit power is as low as 30-60 milliwatts and the new spec could support thousands of nodes and enhancements for outdoor coverage. One of the great advantages of .11ah is that like all Wi-Fi systems it is royalty free and does not require a network operator, said De Vegt. “It’s perfect for something like tracking a fleet of bicycles in a city,” he said. “Farmers can put up a network themselves linking sensors in a field by putting an access point up on a pole,” he concluded. LPWA networks will replace many of today’s expensive wired and cellular links.


EETE SEP 2015
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